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Story of the KellyGang - the Royal Commission evidence
 
 
 
[[Royal Commission report day 32 page 12|previous page]] / [[Royal Commission report day 33 page 1|next page]]
 
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== The Royal Commission evidence for 21/6/1881 ==
 
== The Royal Commission evidence for 21/6/1881 ==
  
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(see also introduction to [[Royal Commission report 21/6/1881|day 32]])
 
(see also introduction to [[Royal Commission report 21/6/1881|day 32]])
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[[Category:Royal Commission]] [[Category:August 1621]] [[Category:Royal Commission]] [[Category:Commisioner Standish]] [[Category:history]]
 
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{{^|Original page location \documents\RoyalCommission\RC810621_32_13_12268.html}}
 
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Latest revision as of 11:02, 20 November 2015

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The Royal Commission evidence for 21/6/1881

(full text transcription)

(see also introduction to day 32)

[[../../people/peA/armstrongHPC.html|Const Henry Armstrong]] 'giving evidence'

12268 Were you selected on your entrance into the police for special service?— Yes.

12269 What was it?— I was told off for cab duty after I joined; that is a privilege, and then; I was told off for plain-clothes duty with Sergeant Dalton.

12270 That was amongst the criminal classes in Melbourne , Little Bourke street and those streets?— Yes, and general duty.

12271 Here is a letter you have written to Mr. Nicolson, 31st May 1881 , in which you write— “You also gave us instructions on that occasion to keep a vigilant guard or watch night and day, which order was also obeyed. A strict watch or guard would also have been kept by the men in Sherritt's but at the time of the murder, in accordance with your previous instructions, were it not that I had received orders from a person to the contrary.” Who was that person?— Detective Ward.

12272 “Who I suppose acted on the advice of your successor. Although no man looks on the conduct of the police at Sebastopol in a worse light than I do myself, I think those who sent us there with improper instructions, namely, to keep no watch, immediately beside Byrne's, knowing Sherritt to be a marked man, made the first blunder and are not free from blame.” Why was he a marked man?— It was pretty well known he was in the employ of the police, and the shot fired over the hut would show be was a marked man.

12273 Your officers had not told you of that at the time?— No.

12274 Is that what you complain of–that you got no information?— Yes, I look on it as a general misfortune. It does not affect me; I will soon be where no one will know me.

12275 Have you seen your record sheet?— No.

12276 If you were in the same position again would you venture out under the same circumstances?— I believe I would, but I would be shot.

12277 It is right to tell you that your record sheet, from all your officers, speaks in the highest terms of your courageous conduct. You were one of the party going to search Rats' Castle?— Yes.

12278 Were you aware how many were at Wangaratta on duty when you left it?— I could not say.

12279 Were you in Sergeant Steele's party?— Yes, I was always with Sergeant Steele.

12280 Was it your impression that those were the traces of the Kellys at the time at the bridge?— Yes, I am thoroughly confident they were, but we were not going to Rats' Castle at that time–we were going round to beat the ranges.

12281 Did you feel you were justified in going away from the tracks?— I did not hear what instructions Sergeant Steele got from Constable Twomey at the time.

12282 We have it in evidence that Mr. Sadleir gave the instructions?— Yes, he did, to go round to Yackandandah the ranges, but Twomey gave those instructions to Steele at Wangaratta, in the train.

12283 Steele has said that, although he was on other duty, and could not turn round, he stated there was nothing to prevent him going?— Well Sergeant Steele, I think, would hardly like to disobey Mr. Sadleir's instructions, I fancy. I could not give any other opinion on that. He was in charge of the party, and he thought he was justified in going on.

12284 You do not think it was an act of cowardice?— By no means; Steele is the wrong mark for that; in fact, I have noticed no cowardice. Any of the constables would have been only too glad to meet the Kellys on equal terms.

The witness withdrew.

Adjourned to Tuesday next at Eleven o'clock .

[~[[see report of proceedings 21/6/1881]|6315]~]

See next day

28/ 6/1881 ....

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